Category: Hunter S Thompson

Bob DylanHunter S Thompson

hunter s thompson – funeral

“The evenin’s empire returns and surrounds me with a single gunshot
And the ragged clowns dance behind me as the fireworks go off” – Ryan Cox


Hunter S Thompson – A Circus Mind

The last lines of this writing make references to the suicide death and funeral of Hunter S Thompson, as well as Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man” which played during his funeral.

Hunter S Thompson took his own life with a single gunshot on February 20, 2005. On August 20, 2005, in a private ceremony, Thompson’s ashes were fired from a cannon atop a 153-foot tower of his own design (in the shape of a double-thumbed fist clutching a peyote button) to the tune of Norman Greenbaum’s “Spirit in the Sky” and Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man.” Red, white, blue, and green fireworks were launched along with his ashes.

“Mr. Tambourine Man” is a song written and performed by Bob Dylan, which was released on his 1965 album Bringing It All Back Home. The song has a bright, expansive melody and has become famous in particular for its surrealistic imagery, influenced by artists as diverse as French poet Arthur Rimbaud and Italian filmmaker Federico Fellini. The lyrics call on the title character to play a song and the narrator will follow. Interpretations of the lyrics have included a worship to drugs such as LSD, a call to the singer’s muse, a reflection of the audience’s demands on the singer, and religious interpretations.

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you

Though I know that evenin’s empire has returned into sand
Vanished from my hand
Left me blindly here to stand but still not sleeping
My weariness amazes me, I’m branded on my feet
I have no one to meet
And the ancient empty street’s too dead for dreaming

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you

Take me on a trip upon your magic swirlin’ ship
My senses have been stripped, my hands can’t feel to grip
My toes too numb to step
Wait only for my boot heels to be wanderin’
I’m ready to go anywhere, I’m ready for to fade
Into my own parade, cast your dancing spell my way
I promise to go under it

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you

Though you might hear laughin’, spinnin’, swingin’ madly across the sun
It’s not aimed at anyone, it’s just escapin’ on the run
And but for the sky there are no fences facin’
And if you hear vague traces of skippin’ reels of rhyme
To your tambourine in time, it’s just a ragged clown behind
I wouldn’t pay it any mind
It’s just a shadow you’re seein’ that he’s chasing

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you

Then take me disappearin’ through the smoke rings of my mind
Down the foggy ruins of time, far past the frozen leaves
The haunted, frightened trees, out to the windy beach
Far from the twisted reach of crazy sorrow
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free
Silhouetted by the sea, circled by the circus sands
With all memory and fate driven deep beneath the waves
Let me forget about today until tomorrow

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you

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Hunter S Thompson

hunter s thompson – for sheriff of pitkin county, co

Vote for me! The sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado
Cigarette smoke curling around a beautiful Brunello – Ryan Cox

“Hunter S Thompson” – A Circus Mind

In 1970 Thompson put together a campaign to elect himself as Sheriff of Pitkin County, home to Aspen, Colorado. The campaign was dubbed Freak Power which garnered nearly all of its support from ‘freaks’, ‘heads’, and ‘dropouts’ from the surrounding areas. It combined aggressive radicalism, a high level of organization, more controversy and danger as well as some frivolous moments. These would include:

* Legalization of drugs on a recreational basis (although profiteering dealers would be prosecuted harshly.)
o Thompson did make a concession on the drugs issue – he promised that if elected, he would not eat mescaline whilst on duty.
* “1.) “Rip up all city streets with jackhammers and sod the streets at once.”
* “2.) “Change the name Aspen to Fat City. This would prevent greed heads, land rapers, and other human jackals from capitalizing on the name ‘Aspen’. These swine should be fucked, broken, and driven across the land.”

“3. “It will be the general philosophy of the sheriff’s office that no drug worth taking shall be sold for money. My first act as sheriff will be to install on the sheriff’s lawn a set of stocks to punish dishonest dope dealers.”

* Firing the majority of the conservative county officials and bureaucrats.
* Thompson shaving his head bald and referring to the crew-cut, ex-army, Republican incumbent as “My long-haired opponent.”
* The distribution of Aspen Wall Posters and flyers across the county.
* Threats received by Thompson during the campaign, including one sent to City Hall following a dynamite theft in the County, insisting that the explosives would only be used if Thompson was elected. This led to Thompson’s house and campaign HQ at Woody Creek taking on the aspect of an armed camp on election night, with guards patrolling the grounds with guns and flashlights.

Ultimately, the ‘Thompson for Sheriff’ campaign was also unsuccessful, partly due to a Republican/Democratic agreement not to stand against each other in certain key elections in order to allow all ‘Non-Thompson’ votes to count towards one candidate and partly due to an article Thompson wrote for Rolling Stone shortly before the election, revealing his strategy.

Hunter S Thompson

hunter s thompson – the end of the 60’s

It was the 1960’s that I laid to rest
Looking to the west as the last wave crests – Ryan Cox

“Hunter S Thompson” A Circus Mind

One of the major themes of Fear and Loathing was about coming to terms with the failure of the 1960’s counterculture movement. The counterculture in the United States reached its peak between 1966 and the early 1970s. It eventually waned for several reasons: mainstream America’s disdain for unrepentant hedonism and conspicuous drug use, and the troubles caused by these excesses; the death of many notable countercultural figures; the end of the Vietnam War; and the end of Civil Rights protests.

Hunter S Thompson

hunter s thompson – roman a clef

Imagination and a device to open a lock
It was my reflection in the mirror I tried to block – Ryan Cox

“Hunter S Thompson” A Circus Mind

This passage refers to Thompson’s use of a roman à clef in “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” as Raoul Duke. Roman à clef translates as “novel with a key,” which really doesn’t explain much in English about what the term means. More specifically, a novel written in this style is supposedly fiction that hides a bit of a secret. Such a novel may be used as satire to mock real people like political figures or celebrities, to actually serve as an author’s autobiography or to be at least semi-autobiographical. Roman à clef may also be used to completely insult and denigrate someone else’s character, but since it is supposedly “fiction” the author avoids charges of slander.

Hunter S Thompson

hunter s thompson – the rum diary/fear and loathing

I arranged my entries, dotted i’s and crossed t’s in distilled molasses
Destroying the American dream by creating a beautiful scene of excess – Ryan Cox

 

The first line refers to Thompson’s early 1960’s novel, “The Rum Diary”. The story involves a journalist named Paul Kemp, who moves from New York to work for a major newspaper, The Daily News, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Set in the late 1950s, the novel encompasses a tangled love story of jealousy, treachery and violent alcoholic lust among the Americans who staff the newspaper.

The second line refers to Thompson’s book, “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream.” Fear and Loathing was first published in the November 1971 issues of Rolling Stone. It was an immediate success as a book, in which Thompson and his attorney, Oscar Zeta Acosta, travel to Las Vegas, get stoned, destroy hotel rooms and infiltrate a District Attorney’s conference. Destruction and degradency are only one tangent of the book; in between the fits of comic mayhem, Thompson makes some insights into What the Sixties Meant and What the Future Holds. It remains one of Thompson’s most popular and best loved works.

Hunter S Thompson

hunter s thompson – the fastest two minutes in sports

From the fastest two minutes in sports
To the distant waters of Puerto Rico’s ports – Ryan Cox

“Hunter S Thompson” – A Circus Mind 

The first line of the entry, “Hunter S Thompson,” refers to Thompson’s place of birth, Louisville, Kentucky. Lousiville annually hosts the Kentucky Derby, a stakes race for thoroughbred horses. The race is commonly referred to as “The fastest two minutes in sports.” It is also known as “The Run for the Roses” for the blanket of roses draped over the winner. It’s also incredible Jerry Garcia Band song.

The second line refers to Thompson’s 1960 move to San Juan, Puerto Rico. He moved to take a job with the sports magazine El Sportivo, which soon folded after his arrival. Thompson then applied for a job with the Puerto Rico English-language daily The San Juan Star, but he ended up being turned down. It also makes reference to Thompson’s book, “The Rum Diaries,” which fictionalized his experiences in Puerto Rico.

Hunter S Thompson

hunter s thompson – when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.

Hunter S Thompson was an American journalist and author, most famous for his works Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ’72. He is credited as the creator of Gonzo journalism, a style of reporting where reporters involve themselves in the action to such a degree that they become central figures of their stories. He is known also for his unrepentant lifelong use of alcohol, LSD, mescaline, and cocaine (among other substances); his love of firearms; his long-standing hatred of Richard Nixon and George W. Bush; and his iconoclastic contempt for authoritarianism.

“Hunter S Thompson” – A Circus Mind

From the fastest two minutes in sports
To the distant waters of Puerto Rico’s ports
I arranged my entries, dotted i’s and crossed t’s in distilled molasses
Destroying the American dream by creating a beautiful scene of excess
Imagination and a device to open a lock
It was my reflection in the mirror I tried to block
It was the 1960’s that I laid to rest
Looking to the west as the last wave crests
Vote for me! The sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado
Cigarette smoke curling around a beautiful Brunello
The evenin’s empire returns and surrounds me with a single gunshot
And the ragged clowns dance behind me as the fireworks go off – Ryan Cox